Central North American Trade Corridor

In the News

"Central Trade Corridor Proponents Meet In Energy City"

By Norm Park | Estevan Mercury | May 25, 2016

There were nine panelists with varying interests and spheres of influence, two keynote presenters who took bold looks into the near future and 60 or more delegates, many of them from North and South Dakota, as well as southern Saskatchewan. They gathered in the main conference room at the Saskatchewan Energy Training Institute (SETI) in Estevan on May 18 to discuss the future of an international trade corridor that includes Mexico, six American states, most of Saskatchewan and eastern Alberta. They talked about a corridor that will embrace technology that most business buyers and sellers and the general public have yet to fully comprehend. The talk was futuristic in nature, but very real in terms of potential applications as the Central North American Trade Corridor Association (CNATCA) conducted this futuristic look on a local educational campus. 

Steve Pedersen, former president of the CNATCA, served as co-host for the idea exchanges along with Estevan Mayor Roy Ludwig. READ MORE

"Plan in the Works for Driverless Highway from Canada to Mexico"

By Jennifer van der Kleut | April 6, 2016

Many experts have said one of the biggest concerns with introducing self-driving cars into society is mixing them on the same streets with human-driven cars.

That’s one of the main reasons why North Dakota native Marlo Anderson says he is working with the Central North American Trade Corridor Association (CNATCA) to develop his idea for an “autonomous highway” that would stretch from Canada to Mexico.

Anderson’s “Autonomous Friendly Corridor” would actually make use of an already-existing highway that he says is widely underused–U.S. Highway 83. READ MORE

"Group Wants to Build Corridor for Unmanned Vehicles"

BY JESSICA HOLDMAN | THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE | MARCH 23, 2014

A trade group wants to create a pathway for self-driving vehicles from Canada, through North Dakota and other states south to Mexico. 

One of the issues with the middle part of the U.S. is the lack of north-south avenues to move commerce, said Marlo Anderson of the Central North American Trade Corridor Association. Rail and major roads move east to west.  READ MORE

"Autonomous Vehicles Are Here Now and Ready To Go"

By David Rookhuyzen | david.rookhuyzen@capjournal.com 

The logistics are still unclear, but the testing of unmanned vehicles along South Dakota roads may be closer than most think.

The Central North American Trade Corridor Association made headlines last week when it discussed plans to test automated vehicles in the central part of the country within the next five years. Two possible test routes announced by the group were between Minot and Bismarck, within North Dakota, or across state lines between Bismarck, N.D., and Pierre.

“The technology is here. Autonomous vehicles are here now and ready to go,”

Marlo Anderson, an interim board member for the association heading up the work on autonomous vehicles, said the route between Bismarck and Pierre has several attractive qualities for this type of testing.  READ MORE

"This is How We Can Make Autonomous Vehicles Mainstream"

May 27, 2014 | Will Schmidt for the National Edition

It’s easy to imagine a world filled with autonomous vehicles: we’ve seen it in movies like Minority Report. But what’s hard to imagine is the road we have to travel to reach that point.

Marlo Anderson, the CEO of Zoovio and host of the Tech Ranch, is heavily involved with the Central North American Trade Corridor Association (CNATCA). In fact, he’s made it his mission to help reform policy and inform civilians about the benefits of autonomous vehicles both on land and in the air.

And while his work is only in its initial startup phase, Anderson has been able to take some big steps toward shifting perhaps one of the biggest paradigms of our culture. I was able to catch up to him and get a deeper look at what he’s doing and why it’s so important.  READ MORE

"Unmanned vehicles through the heart of North Dakota?"

Posted March 19, 2014 | AP - KEYZ am | BISMARCK

A trade group wants to create a pathway for unmanned vehicles through the central U.S.  Marlo Anderson with the Central North American Trade Corridor Association says that major railways and roads move east to west in the middle part of the country, and there's a lack of north-south avenues.

 The association is starting an initiative to develop regulations for driverless vehicles, both on the ground and in the air. One roadblock is that the emerging technology is ahead of regulations.  Anderson says within five years he hopes to have a trial corridor, possibly from Bismarck to Minot or to Pierre, S.D.  Association Chairman Steve Pederson calls the idea "visionary." He says in 10 years, the transportation industry will look a lot different than it does today.  READ MORE"GROUP SEEKS CENTRAL US PATH FOR UNMANNED VEHICLES"

BISMARCK, N.D. | by RSS FEED | MARCH 18, 2014

A trade group wants to create a pathway for unmanned vehicles through the central U.S., from Canada to Mexico.

The Central North American Trade Corridor Association is launching an initiative to develop regulations for driverless vehicles on the ground and in the air.

“It’s a proven but still emerging technology,” association member Bill Davis told The Bismarck Tribune. “In the first step of this project, we’re trying to create interest and awareness. The more effective we can be with transport, the more competitive we can be economically.”

One roadblock is that the emerging technology is ahead of regulations. Another is that major railways and roads in the middle of the country move east to west, and there is a lack of north-south avenues, association member Marlo Anderson said.  READ MORE"Pierre, One Possible Destination for Unmanned Vehicle Corridor"

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 | Associated Press | BISMARCK

 A trade group wants to create a pathway for unmanned vehicles through the central U.S., from Canada to Mexico.

The Central North American Trade Corridor Association is launching an initiative to develop regulations for driverless vehicles on the ground and in the air.

“It’s a proven but still emerging technology,” association member Bill Davis told The Bismarck Tribune. “In the first step of this project, we’re trying to create interest and awareness. The more effective we can be with transport, the more competitive we can be economically.”

One roadblock is that the emerging technology is ahead of regulations. Another is that major railways and roads in the middle of the country move east to west, and there is a lack of north-south avenues, association member Marlo Anderson said.

“The challenge is to find ways to better utilize our north-south routes,” he said.

Within five years the association hopes to have a trial corridor, possibly from Bismarck to Minot, or to Pierre, S.D., to prove the technology, Anderson said. Ports would need to be developed to fuel and service the vehicles and drones, creating a business opportunity for local entrepreneurs, he said.

“I think it’s very visionary,” said Steve Pederson, acting chairman of the association. “Ten years from today, things are going to be a lot different than they are now in transportation.”"Group Wants to Build Corridor for Unmanned Vehicles"

March 17, 2014 By Jessica Holdman

A trade group wants to create a pathway for self-driving vehicles from Canada, through North Dakota and other states south to Mexico.

One of the issues with the middle part of the U.S. is the lack of north-south avenues to move commerce, said Marlo Anderson of the Central North American Trade Corridor Association. Rail and major roads move east to west.

“The challenge is to find ways to better utilize our north-south routes,” he said.

The association is starting an initiative to develop regulations for driverless vehicles, whether on the ground or in the air. It will discuss the initiative Wednesday and Thursday at the Trade & Transportation Summit in Bismarck.  READ MORE"Hoeven, Canadian Envoy Push for Keystone XL Oil Pipeline"

March 19, 2014 | By Nick Smith | BISMARCK

Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., issued another call Wednesday for approval of the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline while in Bismarck for part of a two-day trade summit.

Joining Hoeven’s call was Canadian Ambassador to the United States Gary Doer, who was in town to speak at the Transportation and Trade Beyond Borders Summit at the Ramkota hotel.

“We believe it just makes sense to go with this pipeline,” Doer said.

The Keystone pipeline would stretch from the Canadian province of Alberta to the Gulf Coast. Of the total pipeline capacity of 830,000 barrels of oil per day, 100,000 barrels per day has been promised to Bakken crude.

The majority of the oil traveling through the pipeline would be Canadian oil from the Athabasca Oil Sands in Alberta. Opponents have cited environmental concerns along portions of the pipeline’s route. Republican lawmakers, including Hoeven, have argued that the pipeline would create thousands of jobs and increase infrastructure capacity for shipping crude.  READ MORE

"Dalrymple Promotes North Dakota Trade Mission, Exports In Talks With Canadian Ambassador Doer"

March 18, 2014 | Farm and Ranch Guide | BISMARCK

Gov. Jack Dalrymple will meet in Bismarck late today with Gary Doer, Canada’s ambassador to the United States, to discuss plans for a North Dakota trade mission to Canada the week of June 9, 2014. A delegation of North Dakota exporters will travel to Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, Canada with the North Dakota Trade Office (NDTO). “Canada is by far the largest buyer of North Dakota goods and services and it’s important that we continue to develop this important trade relationship,” Dalrymple said. “The demand for North Dakota’s high-quality products and services continues to grow around the world. Sending a trade delegation to Canada is part of our ongoing work to expand North Dakota’s international business opportunities and further diversify our state economy.”

For nearly 10 years, Gov. Jack Dalrymple and other state officials have worked to increase North Dakota’s presence in the global marketplace. In 2005, the state created the NDTO to help North Dakota businesses market their products and services in high-demand markets throughout the world. Dalrymple, Sen. John Hoeven and the NDTO staff also successfully worked to get established in Fargo an office of the U.S. Commercial Service. Together, the NDTO and U.S. Commercial Service are dedicated to expanding the state’s global business opportunities through advocacy, education and international business services.  READ MORE


 CNATCA is a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization. Phone or Fax 605.299.2679              

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